Tag Archives: cut the cord

Mohu Black Friday $20 Gift Card

Get Your $20 Mohu Gift Card & Enjoy Black Friday All Week!



Here at Mohu, we’re incredibly thankful for so many things: our amazing team, our awesomely loyal Mohuligans like you, and the ability to bring the joy of free TV and savings to so many folks who cut the cord.

 

To show our thanks, we’re offering you a $20 gift card to use toward any purchase on gomohu.com of $60 or more. The best part? Our offer is the real deal and good for our top-quality products, unlike a lot of other offers out there (beware if you’re planning an outing or shopping online elsewhere for deals this week)!

 

And we aren’t just offering this on Black Friday. You can take advantage of this offer anytime between now and December 1, 2014!

 

CLICK HERE TO CLAIM YOUR GIFT CARD

 

Mohu Black Friday

The Pilgrims never paid for TV…

From the entire Mohu team, we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving!

 

*This is a one-time use promotional gift card that can be used only at GoMohu.com as payment for orders of $60.00 or more. The value of the gift card must be used on one order before the expiration date (12/1/2014); any unused amount will be forfeited. Only one promotional gift card can be redeemed per order.



Sample-digital-subchannels-guide

Digital Subchannels: What They Are & Why They’re Awesome



Before I made the choice to cut the cord, I was oblivious to the world of television outside of cable. When it came to cable and television, I thought it was all or nothing; but in reality there are more options than I ever dreamed of. When all the broadcast networks made the transition from analog to digital signal, one of the coolest things that happened was it allowed for the creation of what are called subchannels.

 

What are digital subchannels

Subchannels are extra broadcast signals that overlap the main signal. An even easier way to understand subchannels is to think of them as people sharing the same car on the way to work. Just like a car, a signal can carry only so many subchannels. Broadcasters send a signal of 19.39-megabit-per-second (Mbps) and each subchannel, depending on its quality, takes up some part of that 19.39 Mbps.

 

Whereas regular channels are marked by 1, 2, 3, etc.; subchannels are marked by decimal points. For example, if your local NBC station is on channel 3; its corresponding subchannels will be 3.2, 3.3, and so on. This concept can be a little confusing at first, but give it a little time and it will start to make sense.

 

How to access subchannels & what’s playing

Subchannels are great because they expand the amount of content available through an Over-the-Air (OTA) antenna. Local stations are under no obligation to have a subchannel and are more or less free to broadcast what they want. Because of this, you will be surprised at the types of programming you can find on local subchannels.

 

Some stations broadcast their Doppler radar, local high school sports, old television shows and movies; I’ve even seen an elementary school dance recital that took place on a soccer field. This year’s International Bluegrass Music Association even had their World of Bluegrass awards show broadcast on a local subchannel. If you’re a fan of old school and offbeat television, subchannels can provide hours of free entertainment. Check out our detailed write-up of some of the amazing classic TV shows you can enjoy with your antenna thanks to Antenna TV.

 

Mohu Channels OTA TV Guide
Sample OTA Subchannels TV Guide

 

Why an antenna over cable or satellite

If you’re wondering why you’re just now hearing about subchannels, that’s because you probably have cable. Cable television providers typically don’t use sub-channels (with the exception of music channels). With cable you will have limited access to sub-channels and typically cable providers make them hard to find by placing them in the upper end of the channel range (channels 500 and higher). Satellite providers are even less likely to carry sub-channels since they try to pack as many different stations onto the satellite and are limited to how many they can carry.

 

Even if cable had the same selection and ease of access to subchannels, getting your subchannels through cable would be ill-advised. The cheapest cable subscription you’ll find will still run you somewhere around $30-$40 a month. Why pay that every month when you could get an antenna for the same price – and you only pay once?

 

Simply put, getting an OTA antenna is by far the cheapest and easiest way to access digital subchannels. When most people think of OTA broadcasts and antennas, they think about the rabbit ears of yester-year. Years ago, antennas would be lucky to pick up four channels and even luckier still if you had a clear picture.

 

Today, that’s all changed. Not only can you get access to most of today’s top TV shows, but you can also catch all the retro and esoteric programming you want on subchannels. It may not be as sleek and sexy as Netflix or Amazon Prime, but it is hard to deny the high amount of quality content found on broadcast networks and their subchannels.

 

Cable providers want you to think you don’t have a choice. They want you to think it’s all or nothing; but they are wrong. Cutting the cord was one of the best things I did for my wallet; and best of all I didn’t have to give up any of my favorite shows. If you’re tired of being overcharged and mistreated by the big cable companies, then you know what you must do.

 

Stop struggling, cut the cord, and kill your cable bill today! If you would like to know what the subchannels in your area are, check out this state-by-state list of all the digital subchannels in the US.

 

Dave Kennedy is a long time cordcutter who became increasingly frustrated with the high cost of Cable TV and decided to make a stance. In 2011 he launched KilltheCableBill.com, a site dedicated to helping people save money through providing simple, cost-effective cable TV alternatives. Sine then, David has helped 1,000s of people cancel their cable subscription while keeping the shows they love.



10 of the Best PBS Shows You Can Watch for Free



Satisfying, interesting and fun, PBS broadcasts hundreds of  shows that entertain and educate, and all are free when using a HDTV antenna to capture over-the-air signals. 

 

PBS stations are non-profit and locally run. PBS member stations have quarterly membership drives to keep their programming on the air. Financial gifts by PBS members during these fundraising events are essential to the operation of  all local PBS stations.

 

The continued financial support of this broadcast network by the public has encouraged exponential growth of high quality programming for more than forty yearsPBS programming has been transformed over decades from a few local shows into programming schedules; specific to the viewer’s area, that include world news, music specials, documentaries, children’s programming and so much more!

 

Early Memory of PBS

 

I can remember being a little kid and watching Bert and Ernie on Sesame Street, broadcast over air on PBS (coincidentally, the show is celebrating its 45th anniversary today – find out when and where you can catch it and many more PBS Kids programming for free). Back then, my folks used a ‘rabbit ear’ antenna to get over-the-air TV, which meant that sometimes watching TV resulted in an impromptu yoga workout as I contorted myself to get the antenna adjusted just right to capture the signal.  

 

I still enjoy PBS, and get it for free over air, but thankfully I no longer have to worry about moving my over air antenna around to get a clear signal.  Now I use the Curve 50 Indoor HDTV Antenna to grab digital HD broadcasts, including the shows broadcast by PBS.  I save $100 a month not having cable TV, and I don’t feel like I’m missing out on a thing. 

 

With hundreds of shows that immerse viewers in subjects past and present, PBS has an outstanding number of shows that more than satisfy my intellectual curiosity and desire to be entertained.

 

If you haven’t looked at PBS recently, take a look!  It really is “TV worth watching.”

 

 

10 Terrific PBS Series

 

 

1. Downton Abbey

 

I didn’t think I’d like this show, but after only a few episodes I was hooked!  Definitely worth watching if you enjoy a multi-faceted story line that spans generations and strings together historical moments.

 

Also check out the other Masterpiece series’ on PBS.

 

 

2. Antiques Roadshow

 

Ever wondered how much that old painting hanging in the spare bedroom is worth?

 

If you get started watching this program you’ll definitely be viewing your old stuff as a fresh source of income!  Look for the Antiques Roadshow tour to come to your area and see if you can get on the show.

 

 

3. FRONTLINE

 

Smart, in-depth reporting and edgy visuals are the backbone of this longstanding PBS news series. Focusing on issues related to Health, Technology, Science, Government and Social Issues, FRONTLINE delves deep and provides information that often leads to more questions.

 

4. NATURE

 

A beautifully done series that focus’ on the many aspects of our natural world and the animals that inhabit it. If you enjoy the Discovery Channel on cable, you’ll love this series on PBS.

 

 

5. NOVA

 

Hundreds of educational programs on topics ranging from Ancient Worlds to Technology, NOVA programs are often used by teachers to broaden their students understandings of specific topics.

 

http://youtu.be/a_dLlUnQa0c

 

6. American Experience

 

A historical series that gives the viewer insights into American history, often played out on the world stage. The American Experience is a unique adventure, filled with monumental achievements and horrific tragedies that continue to mold our nation to this day.

 

The Freedom Riders ,  Mount Rushmore, and the Civil War are a few of the shows that make up the American Experience. 

 

http://youtu.be/dHVOpuxjGyw

 

7. American Masters

 

This series celebrates arts and culture, showcasing performer biographies.  Musicians, actors, writers and visual artists come into focus through a new lens when viewing the video library of the American Masters.

 

 

8. PBS NEWSHOUR

 

An eclectic mix of topics are covered, all in a professional news format that is akin to 60 Minutes or a similar network program.  Each episode covers a topic or two in a way that provides the viewer with a new understanding.

 

 

9. Austin City Limits

 

Concerts in the comfort of your own home! Get front row seats to the best musical entertainment in HD with this concert series that showcases acts from all the major genres of music.

 

 

 

10. Great Performances

 

Where else are you going to enjoy Tony Bennett in concert with Lady Gaga?  Dance, drama, musical theater and opera performances are showcased in this fantastic series.

 

 

 

Andrea Polk hails from Oregon and is a wife, mother, writer, Amazon Top 50 Reviewer, and more. She’s also the author of the Simple Guide to Over-the-Air Free TV as well as the avid deal-seeker behind SavvySleuth.com, where she scours the web for the best online deals.

 



Cordcutting for Sports Fans: Cut the Cord, Keep Your Sports



Cordcutting for Sports Fans
Cut the Cord but Keep Your Sports

For movies and television lovers, cutting the cord is a relatively simple procedure. Most content providers now a days want you to consume their product wherever and whenever. However, it is a bit more complicated process when it comes to cordcutting for sports fans. Most professional sports leagues have very lucrative deals with cable providers and advertisers; and they don’t want to jeopardize that relationship by offering stand-alone streaming subscription packages. Sadly for many would be cord cutters, accessing sports is the one sticking point that keeps them from making the switch.

 

However, contrary to popular belief, there are plenty of options out there for the sports loving cord cutter; options that the cable companies don’t want you to know about. Today we are going to talk about a few of the many options you have to kill your cable bill while keeping your favorite sports. Let’s get started.

 

Sports on OTA  

If you asked me what the simplest, cheapest, and most effective way of watching sports without cable was; I would emphatically say the use of an Over-the-Air (OTA) antenna. An OTA antenna picks up the signal from the national broadcast networks (ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, and CW) and broadcasts it to your television. In short, an OTA antenna is the rabbit ears of the 21st century.

 

By using an OTA antenna, you get access to games from every professional and collegiate sport you can think of: baseball, basketball, football, etc… Of course you won’t be able to watch every game for every sport; but you will gain access to a large swathe of the sports programming available. When you take into consideration the amount of content you get for the cost, there is no better option than an OTA antenna.

 

NFL

There are a lot of ways to watch NFL these days. As I mentioned above, the best option for watching NFL games is with your OTA antenna. You’ll be able to catch almost every regular season Thursday and Sunday game that’s broadcast in your area. One of the best supplemental options for the cord cutting football fanatic (in addition to an HDTV antenna) is NFL GamePass. NFL GamePass offers a three tiered system packed with extras features that are more than enough to keep you entertained in-between game days.

 

A limitation to NFL GamePass, as well as some other subscription services, is that it is only available to customers outside of the United States. Fortunately, you can circumvent this regional lockout by using a Virtual Private Network (VPN). I won’t bore you on the details (you can read more about accessing NFL GamePass in the US here), but essentially a VPN reroutes your internet traffic through public servers in other countries. By doing that, the VPN tricks internet severs into thinking you’re in another country; which gives you access to these blocked out programs.

 

If you aren’t as tech-savvy and would rather not set up a VPN, there are other options to satiate your NFL cravings. The most comprehensive is NFL Sunday Ticket that lets you watch all the games with your video game console, streaming device, mobile device, and more. Other options that are great complements to watching live with your HDTV antenna include NFL AudioPass and NFL GameRewind.

 

MLB

Ah baseball, the great American pastime. Unlike other sports, baseball isn’t heavily broadcasted over the air, so most baseball fans are stuck buying cable. However, there is a streaming service called MLB.TV which allows you to watch live broadcasts of out of market baseball games (non home team games) for $10 a month. Sadly, you also don’t get access to playoff games if you’re in the US. MLB has some intense rules when it comes to black-outs, so you’re better off routing your VPN through a different country as opposed to a different state. Also, there have been rumors of MLB checking the billing address of users suspected of using a VPN; so don’t go shouting it to the world.

 

NHL 

Hockey is a wonderful sport. Who doesn’t love seeing grown men pound the crap out of each other while gliding on razor sharp blades attached to their feet? Hockey fans don’t get a lot of love from the major sports broadcasters, but in a way that works in favor of hockey fans. For $150 or eight payments of $20, you can get access to almost all your favorite hockey games with NHL GameCenter. Unlike MLB.TV or NFL GameDay Pass, you don’t have to use a VPN to access every game. Although regional and in-market games are not available live, they do become available on-demand 48 hours later. If you’re not so patient, you can use a VPN to access in-market games live. You don’t get access to the Stanley Cup with GameCenter, but you can watch that on NBC so all you need is an OTA antenna.

 

NBA

For millions of Americans, there is no football or baseball; there is only basketball. If you are not content with catching only regional over-the-air broadcasts of games, then you might want to consider NBA League Pass. For $150, League Pass gives you access to every out of market regular game; and if you use a VPN you can get every game. Unfortunately, the US version of League Pass does not cover playoffs or the finals.

 

However, if you use a VPN you can get League Pass international. The premium version gives you access to every game, regular season AND post season. The prices vary, depending on which country you route your VPN through. Don’t use Australia or you will pay a staggering $300. Argentina is the cheapest, running you about $130 for the whole season.

 

Would-be cord cutters don’t have to go without their favorite sport to liberate themselves from burdensome cable bills. Most of your worries can be solved by getting an OTA antenna, and you can fill in the gaps by using a VPN and whatever streaming service your sport of choice provides. Although every package discussed today comes with a price tag, you have the flexibility to pick and choose exactly which sports, games, and options are best for you instead of being tethered to bulky sports packages & ongoing monthly bills with cable and satellite.

 

Dave Kennedy is a long time cordcutter who became increasingly frustrated with the high cost of Cable TV and decided to make a stance. In 2011 he launched KilltheCableBill.com, a site dedicated to helping people save money through providing simple, cost-effective cable TV alternatives. Sine then, David has helped 1,000s of people cancel their cable subscription while keeping the shows they love.



How Much You Overpay for Cable vs. Mohu (INFOGRAPHIC)



We all know that cable is overpriced and that cutting the cord can save you hundreds of dollars. But just how much more does that cable subscription cost you?

 

Costs of Cable vs. Mohu Antenna

The average low-tier cable package costs you about $65 per month, or nearly $775 per year, and gets you 189 channels, of which you likely only watch about 17. That means that you’re paying about $0.40 per channel. But when you really do the math, you’re paying per month upwards of $3.68 per channel you actually watch!

 

In comparison, with your Mohu Leaf® 30 antenna, you can pull in an average of 53 channels at a total one-time price of $39.99 (a.k.a. no monthly bills attached). That means that you’re looking at a mere $0.06 cents per channel over a one-year span, and the cost continues to diminish over time since you only have the one-time cost of buying the antenna! To offer a fair comparison though, let’s assume you’re still only watching 17 of those channels – the math is still significantly below the cost of cable at $0.19 cents per channel watched.

 

Even if you chalk up a little extra cash for the Mohu Leaf® 50 HDTV antenna, you’re still looking at significant savings compared to cable. At an average of 56 channels with the Leaf 50, you’re looking at just $0.09 cents per channel and $0.29 cents per channel watched.

 

Here’s a visual breakdown of how much you overpay for cable, just how many channels you realistically watch, and how much each of those channels are costing you.

 

Cable vs. Leaf 30

Costs of Cable versus Mohu Leaf 30 Antenna

click to view full-size

 

Cable vs. Leaf 50

Cost of Cable versus Mohu Leaf 50 Antenna

click to view full-size

 

TL;DR

With cable, you’re paying nearly $775 a year for 189 channels and yet you’re only watching 9% of them. Why keep overpaying for channels you don’t watch? Find out how much free TV you can enjoy with an indoor HDTV antenna and start saving.



Simple Cord Cutting: “How Do You Cut the Cord with Mohu?”



“Cord cutting requires you to decide you want to save money, to commit to making a lifestyle change and to be willing to try something new.”

 

Cord cutting isn’t complicated, however some people are afraid to try to cut the cord because of the false assumption that you need to be technically savvy to get the job done (among other reasons).  The truth is, if you can read simple directions and aren’t afraid to make a small effort to dial in the channels at your location, practically anyone can get free TV using an HDTV antenna.

 

It’s not expensive or difficult to cut the cord. Any initial costs associated with purchasing an over-the-air antenna are quickly recouped in the first month of savings earned after the first month free from cable or satellite TV.

Simple Cord Cutting: How Over Air TV Works

How Over Air TV Works

 

Digital Drives the Signal

 

To grab free over-the-air TV signals and view television broadcasts on your TV, you need the right equipment.  This doesn’t mean you have to rush out and buy hundreds of dollars worth of new stuff, but it does mean that what you use must be able to capture and descramble digital over air TV signals.

 

Cord cutting requires that you have a TV that’s digital-ready. The TV you use to view over-the-air TV broadcasts needs to have a digital tuner inside or attached to it. Digital tuners are what decipher digital over-the-air TV broadcasts.  If you have a newer, flat TV, it most likely has a digital tuner already built into it. However if you view TV programming on an older box-type set, you’ll need a digital converter box.

 

Digital converter boxes are cheap, starting at about $30, and act as an external digital tuner for older TVs. They allow you to view digital TV signals on your older TV without having to buy a new LED, LCD or Plasma TV with the digital tuner inside.

 

 

Over-The-Air HDTV Antennas

 

Digital HDTV over-the-air antennas can be indoor or outdoor, as long as the range of the antenna you are using is adequate for your location.

 

Select one indoor HDTV antenna for each TV in your household you want to receive over air TV.  Make sure the TV broadcast towers in your area are within range of your chosen antenna.

 

For example, if the  local TV towers are all within 30 miles of your location, you would be able to purchase an antenna with a range of 30 miles to receive the TV signals broadcast over air in your area. The Leaf 30 HDTV Indoor Antenna is ideal.

 

I use two Mohu Leaf 50 antennas to cut the cord because the furthest TV towers broadcasting in my area are over 40 miles away.  One Mohu 50 antenna is connected to my smart TV in the living room, and the other is connected to a 24” LED monitor that’s connected to my PC.  The monitor has a built-in digital tuner, so when I’m not using the monitor for work I can watch TV via a connected Mohu antenna.

 

Alternatively you may use a splitter to share a single over air antenna’s signal with other TVs in your home.  This is a bit more complicated as it means more cables and an antenna that’s best installed in the attic or on your roof.

 

The Jolt 4-Way Antenna Amplifier by Mohu allows up to four televisions to share the over air signals from a single Mohu Sky 60 HDTV Attic / Outdoor Antenna. It’s a great option for large households on a budget to enjoy free over-the-air TV.

 

Cut the Cord

 

I love Mohu antennas for their ease of use and performance. When using a Mohu antenna to cut the cord, remember these tips for easy installation and use of your HDTV antenna.

1.  Easy step-by-step directions are included with each antenna. Read them prior to setup and use.

 

2. Placement of the antenna is key to successful over air reception. Try several locations. Higher is usually better.

 

3.  Scan for channels using your TV’s remote and make sure the input is set to ‘Air’ to pick up over-the-air TV broadcasts.

 

4.  If you have questions, remember you can always check out the Mohu FAQs, their Forum or contact Mohu Support.

 

Over-the-air TV gives you all the latest network programming in HD and it’s easy to obtain with the right Mohu HDTV antenna. Cut the cord with Mohu and start saving money today!

 

Andrea Polk hails from Oregon and is a wife, mother, writer, Amazon Top 50 Reviewer, and more. She’s also the author of the Simple Guide to Over-the-Air Free TV as well as the avid deal-seeker behind SavvySleuth.com, where she scours the web for the best online deals.



stop

Five reasons people still pay for cable (but shouldn’t)



Do you or someone you know suffer from “spending too much money on TV services you don’t actually need”?

 

This may not be recognized in the DSM-5, but the question remains nonetheless. Too often we hear horror stories of people who are spending far too much cash on paid TV (satellite, cable or even both). Sometimes they don’t realize there are alternatives, and sometimes people are wary of change.

 

Here are some common reasons we hear (and our responses) regarding why someone hasn’t dropped pay TV.

 

1) “There aren’t any other options out there.”

 

Paying for TV is one of those quintessential American pastimes, much like baseball or the West Virginia Roadkill Cookoff. But like many things, it has become antiquated and replaced by better options. As you’re aware, you can watch nearly every top TV show for free with Mohu HDTV antennas. But education is key, and cable companies don’t want anyone knowing there are superior substitutes.

 

Pay TV survives because it is the lowest common denominator for entertainment — it has a solid infrastructure spanning the country. It has a large content selection, filled with programming you may or may not be interested in. Lots of people like watching TV. It makes sense, right?

 

Wrong. Price hikes are outpacing inflation. As for that infrastructure? It’s not exactly popular or properly maintained. Regarding content, why would anyone want to pay for something you can get for free?

 

2) “I can’t get my favorite show over the air!”

Luckily for you, there are tons of various streaming services that complement OTA HDTV. Couple a service like Netflix, Hulu or Crackle with web content and your Mohu antenna, and you’ve got access to more content than any cable service can offer — for less than what you’re paying now.

 

3) “I can’t get my sports fix without it.”

In addition to having games broadcast in 1080i HD over the air, there are countless apps and streaming services that fill the gaps for every armchair quarterback. Services include:

 

 

4) “I’m not techie enough to get an HDTV antenna. Cable is simple — just plug it in and go.”

 

HDTV antennas are one of the most practical investments you can make, both functionally and financially. Installing an HDTV antenna is easier than any satellite box, and on par with the “plug it in and go” mentality from some cable providers. Installing an HDTV antenna boils down to this:

 

  1. Find out which HDTV antenna works best for you
  2. Purchase the HDTV antenna
  3. Plug your HDTV antenna into your television
  4. Scan for channels
  5. Enjoy free TV

 

The most complicated portion of your experience will likely be determining where to place your antenna. We’ve considered that as well. Mohu Leaf antennas are built to be paper-thin and easily hidden. Mohu Curve antennas offer the same quality and range, but are aesthetically pleasing for public display.

 

5) “Paying for TV is awesome.”

 

Wait. No one in the history of ever has said this with sincerity. The average cable bill is upwards of $80 a month, and we can think of several ways you could better spend that money than to pay for cable.



Simple Cord Cutting: “Can I REALLY Get Free TV?”



“Yes you can, and it’s super easy to do!”

 

You don’t have to lose out on great entertainment just because you cut the cord. Cord cutting gives you the opportunity to grab over-the-air free TV and save money without losing out on today’s best entertainment, sports or news programming.

 

Over-the-air TV has been around for a long time, but recent advancements in antenna technology have truly made cord cutting a viable option to expensive cable or satellite TV for a broader demographic of people.

 

It’s no longer a complicated process to setup and use an over air antenna. New digital over air technology makes it a simple and inexpensive process to easily access over-the-air TV and eliminate a costly monthly expense .

 

My Mohu Leaf 50 HDTV Antenna has allowed me to cut the cord and save $100 a month.  I watch local and national news in HD from ABC, CBS, NBC and FOX, in addition to the latest sitcoms, dramas and major sporting events. NFL football on my 60” LED HDTV is amazing!

 

Anyone Can Do It

 

Even non-tech savvy consumers who are willing to let go of their fears and try something new can find happiness cutting the cord.

 

In just a few steps and with very little effort, online tools like the one at AntennaWeb can show you what TV broadcast towers are in your area and what channels are being broadcast.

 

Towers are shown on a map, giving you directional guidance to help set up your over air antenna. The distance of these towers from your location is called the range, and it’s what helps you to determine the best over-the-air antenna for you.

 

If you live in an urban location with TV towers close to you, the Leaf Metro Indoor HDTV antenna is a good choice. It pulls in TV signals from as far away as 25 miles and it’s very small so that it can be discretely placed to blend easily into your decor.

 

Cost to Begin Cord Cutting

 

Depending upon the current TV you own and what antenna you choose to secure your over-the-air signal, your initial equipment costs can be less than the price of one month of cable or satellite TV.

 

Older televisions which are lacking digital tuners will need digital converter boxes to translate digital over air TV signals.

 

By contrast, contemporary flat TVs with digital tuners built in don’t need converter boxes and can simply be hooked up to a digital antenna to obtain free TV within minutes of installation.

 

Ultimately the only ongoing cost related to receiving free over-the-air TV is the electricity you use to power your television.

 

Exceptionally Exciting Savings

 

In addition to potentially saving you hundreds of dollars each year, cord cutting allows you to regain the freedom to choose how you want to spend your entertainment dollars. HDTV antennas provide you with the ability to enjoy free TV, without hidden fees or costly subscriptions.

 

You still end up getting the latest network programming, much of it in uncompressed high definition, which is actually sharper than the compressed HD programming you get from your cable provider.

 

Over-the-air programming is of excellent quality and clarity, and the best part, you’re not paying for it!

 

Free TV is for real and available to almost everyone. Dialing in a bunch of free TV channels in HD feels like you’ve won the lottery.  It’s about a $1200 a year jackpot in cord cutting savings that’s well worth the minimal cost of the ticket.

 

Andrea Polk hails from Oregon and is a wife, mother, writer, Amazon Top 50 Reviewer, and more. She’s also the author of the Simple Guide to Over-the-Air Free TV as well as the avid deal-seeker behind SavvySleuth.com, where she scours the web for the best online deals.